Fraunhofer IWS

Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS

© Fraunhofer IWS
laser hardening

The business areas joining, cutting and surface technology are the main foci of the Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS. The research and development activities base on a distinctive know-how in the field of material engineering and nanotechnology and include the possibility of material characterization. The IWS`s special feature is its expertise in combining its know-how with its extensive experience in developing system technologies within the field of film- and laser technology.

Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS

Winterbergstr. 28

01277 Dresden

Germany

Phone +49 351 83391-0

Fax +49 351 83391-3300

Latest News

14.11.2019

Fine-tuning for additive production

Additive manufacturing systems can generate highly complex components, which could not be produced with conventional machine tools or only with great effort. Nevertheless, such industrial 3D printers are far from being standard equipment in factories. This is not just due to the purchase costs, but also to many other challenges. The Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS Dresden has developed particular solutions and will present them at the “formnext” trade fair in Frankfurt am Main in November 2019. Included here are “COAXshield”, a local molten pool shield for laser powder build-up welding and the “LIsec” analysis device for controlling the powder flow in additive manufacturing processes.
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11.11.2019

“KaSiLi”: Better batteries for electric cars “Made in Germany”

In the umbrella concept “Research Fab Battery”, German scientists want to develop novel batteries that are capable of storing at least 70 percent more energy for electric vehicles and smartphones than conventional lithium-ion solutions while maintaining the same volume. As part of the cluster of competence for battery materials “ExcellBattMat“ funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), Dresden's “ExcellBattMat Center” (project KaSiLi: structural cathode adaptation for silicon and lithium materials) contributes key components for this new battery generation. On November 1, 2019, researchers from Fraunhofer, TU Dresden and Leibniz started working together on innovative battery electrodes consisting of ultra-thin silicon or lithium layers to achieve high energy densities.
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5.11.2019

High entropy alloys for hot turbines and tireless metal-forming presses

A new class of materials promises many innovations in aviation, turbine construction and other branches of industry: High entropy alloys (HEA) are metals in which five or more elements are atomically bonded in similar proportions. Properly designed, they are harder, more heat-resistant and lighter than steel, aluminum and other classic materials. For about 15 years, engineers around the world have been trying to make these innovative materials ready for series production. But high-entropy alloys are still too expensive and difficult to process. The Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS Dresden is therefore now inviting experts to a symposium in March 2020 to demonstrate how they can overcome these problems – for example through industrial 3D printing, in other words “Additive Manufacturing”. Fraunhofer IWS will give a first insight with the lecture “High entropy alloys for Additive Manufacturing” on November 21, 2019, 2:15 p.m. at the “TCT Introducing Stage” during the “Formnext” trade fair in Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
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17.9.2019

Heat shields for economical aircrafts

To make aircrafts more economical, environmentally friendly and robust, Fraunhofer engineers from Dresden have developed a new ceramic heat shield technology. In this process, a powder of yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide (YSZ) is added to water to form a suspension. Quickly and cost-effectively this liquid powder mixture can be sprayed onto turbine blades or other aircraft parts. Such and similar thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) facilitate aircraft engines, which consume less fuel and do not contaminate the atmosphere as much.
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